banner
banner
banner
Sinus infection treatment

Sinusitis – Sinus Infection Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Diagnosis

123

Inflamed sinus part of the nasal area is Sinusitis meaning.

Learn here about Sinusitis, including the types of an acute and chronic sinus infection, symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and risk factors, treatment. Get rid of a sinus infection with the sinusitis article.

Sinus infection treatment

Say Goodbye To Unbearable Sinusitis Pain                                                   Image credit: iStockphoto

Suffer No More Sinusitis – Know Everything You Need to Know about Sinus Infection

What is Sinusitis?

Sinusitis is the infections or inflammation of the sinus.

About Sinusitis and Sinus Infection

Sinusitis is a medical condition which usually caused by a viral infection and often improves within two or three weeks where the lining of the sinuses becomes inflamed. These sinuses are cavities which are small and air-filled and lies behind your cheekbones and forehead.

In sinusitis, small channels are blocked through which the mucus produced by your sinuses usually drains into your nose because the sinus linings are inflamed (swollen).

What are the Types of Sinusitis?

There are generally four types of sinusitis generally we hear from doctors. They are:

  1. Acute sinusitis: This type sinusitis suddenly starts with cold-like symptoms such as a runny, stuffy nose and facial pain. It lasts 2 to 4 weeks.
  2. Sub-acute sinus: Subacute sinus inflammation or swelling usually lasts 4 to 12 weeks.
  3. Chronic sinusitis: chronic inflammation symptoms last 12 weeks or longer.
  4. Recurrent sinusitis: This type of sinusitis occurs many times in a year.

What Causes Sinusitis?

The following are considered to be various causes of Sinusitis

  1. allergies and related conditions, including allergic rhinitis, asthma, and hay fever
  2. nasal polyps (growths inside the nose)
  3. smoking
  4. a weakened immune system

Sinusitis – Signs and symptoms

Sinusitis usually occurs after cold which is an upper respiratory tract infection. Symptoms of sinusitis include the following.

  • A green or yellow discharge from your nose
  • A blocked nose
  • Pain and tenderness around your cheeks, eyes or forehead
  • A sinus headache
  • A high temperature (fever) of 38C (100.4F) or more
  • Toothache
  • A reduced sense of smell
  • Bad breath (halitosis)

Sinusitis in Children

Children suffering from sinusitis may be irritable, breathe through their mouth, and have difficulty feeding and their speech may also sound nasal (as though they have a stuffy cold).

However, these symptoms of sinusitis are often clear up within a few weeks (acute sinusitis) although occasionally, they can last three months or more (chronic sinusitis).

Treating Sinus Infection and Sinusitis Treatment

People with sinusitis don’t need to see their GP because this condition is normally caused by a viral infection that clears up on its own. You can look after yourself at home because your symptoms usually pass within two or three weeks (acute sinusitis).

However, if the condition is severe, gets worse, or doesn’t improve (chronic sinusitis); you may need to undergo additional treatment from your GP or a hospital specialist. It may be several months before you’re feeling better because this can be usually difficult to treat.

When to See your GP?

You don’t usually need to see your GP and can look after yourself at home if your symptoms are mild and getting better.

See your GP if:

  1. your sinusitis infection symptoms are severe or getting worse
  2. your sinusitis infection symptoms haven’t started to improve after around 7-10 days
  3. you experience episodes of sinusitis frequently

Your GP will diagnose the sinusitis from your symptoms and by examining the inner portion of your nose.

If you have severe or recurrent sinusitis, they may refer you to an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialist for further assessment.

How Sinusitis is treated?

You can help relieve your sinusitis infection symptoms by:

  • Using nasal decongestants – these shouldn’t be used for more than a week, as this might make things worse
  • Holding warm packs to your face
  • Regularly cleaning the inside of your nose with a saline solution – you can make this at home yourself or use sachets of ingredients bought from a pharmacy

If your sinus infection symptoms aren’t improving or are getting worse, your GP may prescribe antibiotics or spray or drops as prescribed by your GP.

You may be referred to an ENT specialist for surgery to improve the drainage of your sinuses if your symptoms don’t get better after trying these treatments.

Medical Advice for Sinusitis

Try self-care like drinking plenty of fluids if you have mild symptoms of sinusitis. Talk to your doctor immediately if your symptoms don’t improve within a few days or if you have any of the following problems

  • Fever greater than 100.5 F
  • Pain
  • Swelling or redness on your face or your eyes
  • Severe headache
  • Confusion
  • Stiff neck

Looking after yourself at home – Remedies for Sinus infection

If you are experiencing mild symptoms and have lasted less than a week or so, then you can usually take care of yourself without seeing your GP. Read now home remedies for sinus infection.

The following are the tips which may help you feel better until you recover:

  1. Check the leaflet that comes with your medication first to check it’s suitable, and never give aspirin to children under 16 years of age.
  2. Use over-the-counter decongestant nasal sprays or drops to help unblock your nose and allow you to breathe more easily – these shouldn’t be used for more than a week at a time.
  3. Apply warm packs to your face to soothe your pain and help mucus drain from your sinuses.
  4. Regularly clean the inside of your nose with a salt water solution to help unblock your nose and reduce nasal discharge.
  5. Cleaning inside your nose.

You can clean the inside of your nose using either a home-made salt water solution or a solution made with sachets of ingredients bought from a pharmacy.

For the home solution, mix a teaspoon of salt and a teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda into a pint of boiled water that has been left to cool. To rinse your nose:

  • Wash and dry your hands
  • Stand over a sink, cup the palm of one hand and pour a small amount of the solution into it
  • Sniff the water into one nostril at a time

Repeat these steps until your nose feels more comfortable and you need not to use all of the solutions. You should make a fresh solution every day and never re-use a solution made the day before.

You can use special devices instead of your hand are also available for pharmacies. However, make sure you follow the manufacturer’s instructions about using and cleaning if you choose to use one of these.

Sinus Drainage

What Causes Sinus Drainage?  

It is quite normal for sinuses to produce and drain mucus down the back of your throat and in most of the cases, you wouldn’t even notice. You will notice this when sinuses develop a problem that the drainage becomes an issue.

Sinus drainage can be worsened because of the following factors:

  • Dry air
  • Dehydration
  • Weather changes
  • Allergies
  • Cold and flu
  • Sinus infection (sinusitis)

The increase in mucus isn’t a problem as long as your sinuses are draining properly, though it can be annoying. The actual problems start when the passages become blocked or fail to let the sinuses drain effectively and resulting pressure can be intolerable for many people.

Sometimes, Sinus infections resolve themselves, but often require antibiotics. A chronic sinus infection needs further treatment like balloon sinuplasty so as to open the sinus passages that are blocked and allow effective drainage.

How can I prevent sinus drainage?

The following are a few tips for dealing with the drainage and preventing from developing into larger problems.

  • Thin the drainage by staying well hydrated and using a humidifier at home, especially in your bedroom.
  • Flush your sinuses regularly with a saltwater solution to encourage healthy drainage and prevent blockages.
  • Prevent sinus drainage from being a problem at night by propping your head, neck, and shoulders up on pillows, or by using a foam wedge.
  • Talk to your doctor about medication, such as allergy medications.
  • If your sinus problems persist, a minor procedure such as balloon sinuplasty may promote healthy drainage and provide the relief you need.

What is Sinus Headache?

Sinus headaches are headaches that may feel like pressure around your eyes, cheeks, and forehead and an infection in the sinuses (sinusitis). Apart from the above feelings your head throbs.

Many people assume that they actually have migraines or tension headaches does not believe that they have headaches from sinusitis, including the people who have received the related diagnosis.

Symptoms of Sinus Headache

The following are the Signs and symptoms of sinus headaches and are regardless of cause:

  • Pain, pressure, and fullness in your cheeks, brow or forehead
  • Worsening pain if you bend forward or lie down
  • Stuffy nose
  • Fatigue
  • Achy feeling in your upper teeth

Sinus Headache Treatment

Sinus headache treatment is depending on the causes, symptoms, and severity of sinus headache etc.

Sinus FAQs:

What makes sinusitis more likely in adults?

Infections and smoking are the main things that make sinusitis more likely for adults.

What can cause Sinusitis in children?

For children, things that can cause sinusitis include:

  • Allergies
  • Illnesses from other kids at daycare or school
  • Pacifiers
  • Bottle drinking while lying on the back
  • Smoke in the environment

Is sinusitis common?

More than 37 million Americans suffer from at least one episode of acute sinusitis over a year. Increased pollution, urban sprawl and increased antibiotic resistance are partially to blame for the increase in sinusitis over the last decade.

Are non-prescription nose drops or sprays effectively?

Non-prescription nose drops or sprays are not effective because they can help to control symptoms. However, they should not be used for longer than their label recommendation.

Is lifestyle changes part of treatment?

If you have a sinus problem, it’s important to avoid smoking. Take extra fluids that can help mucus to be thinned.

When is sinus surgery used for treatment?

Sinus surgery may be required when antibiotics are not effective.

Is sinus remedies useful or workout?

Yes. home remedies for sinusitis are most useful and help you to ease your Sinus infection symptoms and heal at home.

Acute Sinusitis – Sinus Infection Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Diagnosis

What is Acute Sinusitis?

Acute sinusitis also called acute rhinosinusitis.

Acute sinusitis is an inflammation or swelling of the membranes that line your nose and surrounding sinuses for a short period of time. In general, Healthy sinuses are filled with air but when they are blocked and filled with fluid, germs can grow and cause an infection in the sinuses.

This hampers your ability to drain mucus from your nose and sinuses resulting pressure on the cheekbones, near the eyes, or over the forehead and Difficulty in breathing.

According to the American Academy of Otolaryngology, acute sinusitis is a common disease due to a cold-causing viral infection and can be due to noninfectious causes as well. The surveys stated that it affecting around 1 in 8 adults per year.

In the majority of cases, home remedies are enough to treat acute sinusitis but the persistent sinusitis can lead to serious infections and other complications. In most cases, it resolves within a week to 10 days unless a bacterial infection develops.

If it is infected, it lasts more than 12 weeks despite medical treatment is called chronic sinusitis. It could be dangerous if you neglect even a simple cold.

Signs & Symptoms of Acute Sinusitis

The following are the Symptoms of acute sinusitis include:

  • Nasal congestion
  • Thick yellow or green mucus discharge from the nose
  • Sore throat
  • A cough, usually worse at night
  • Drainage of mucus in the back of your throat
  • Headache
  • Pain, pressure, or tenderness behind your eyes, nose, cheeks, or forehead
  • Earache
  • Reduced sense of smell
  • Reduced sense of taste
  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Erythema, or redness of the skin over the sinus caused by increased blood flow to the capillaries
  • Dental pain
  • Bad breath (halitosis)

Causes of Acute Sinusitis

The common cause for sinusitis is cold. The other conditions or illness that can cause or lead to acute sinusitis. The list of sinusitis causes include:

  • Bacteria
  • Fungi
  • Intranasal allergies, such as hay fever
  • Nasal polyps or other tumors
  • Deviated nasal septum
  • Infected adenoids
  • Cystic fibrosis, an inherited genetic disease where thick, sticky mucus produced in the body
  • An infected tooth could also cause acute sinusitis.
  • In rare cases, bacteria can spread from the infected tooth to the sinuses.
  • Viral, such as the common cold virus, bacterial or fungal.
  • Allergies (hay fever)
  • Deviated nasal septum
  • Nasal polyps (tissue growths)
  • Infected adenoids
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • For children, things that can cause sinusitis include:
  • Allergies
  • Illnesses from other kids at daycare or school
  • Pacifiers
  • Bottle drinking while lying on the back
  • Smoke in the environment
  • The major things that make sinusitis more likely for adults are smoking and infections.

Risk factors of Acute Sinusitis

  • Intranasal allergies
  • Abnormalities of nasal passage like deviated septum or nasal polyp
  • Tobacco smoking
  • Frequent breathing in of other pollutants
  • Large or inflamed adenoids
  • Spending a lot of time in a daycare, preschool, or other areas where infectious germs are frequently present
  • Pressure changes activities such as flying and scuba diving
  • A weakened immune system
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Acute bronchitis
  • Prolong use of decongestant spray
  • Diabetes
  • HIV infection
  • Immotile cilia syndrome

Who’s at risk for acute sinusitis?

  • Intranasal allergies
  • Nasal passage abnormalities, such as a deviated septum or nasal polyp
  • Tobacco smoking or frequent breathing in of other pollutants
  • Large or inflamed adenoids
  • Spending a lot of time in a daycare, preschool, or other areas where infectious germs are frequently present
  • Activities that result in pressure changes, such as flying and scuba diving
  • A weakened immune system
  • Cystic fibrosis

Prevention Cure for Acute Sinus

To reduce your risk of getting acute sinusitis, take these sinus infection prevention steps to help:

  • Avoid upper respiratory infections: Minimize your contact with people who have cold and acute respiratory or acute respiratory or sinus infections. Wash your hands frequently especially before your meals with soap and water.
  • Manage your allergies: Take your doctor’s advice to keep symptoms under control. Get your entire family a yearly flu vaccine and treat allergies promptly.
  • Avoid cigarette smoke and polluted air: Try to avoid tobacco smoke and other pollutants that irritate and inflame your lungs and nasal passages.
  • Use a humidifier: Adding moisture to the air may help prevent sinusitis if the air in your home is dry, such as it is if a forced-air heat. Make sure the humidifier stays clean and free of the mold with a regular, thorough cleaning.

Complications of Acute Sinusitis

Acute sinusitis complications are rare and uncommon. If they occur, they might include:

  • Chronic sinusitis: Acute sinusitis can be a long-term problem known as chronic sinusitis. Chronic sinusitis may last longer than 12 weeks.
  • Meningitis: This infection causes inflammation or swelling of the membranes and form fluid surrounding your brain and spinal cord.
  • Other infections: Rarely, the infection can spread to the bones called osteomyelitis or skin called cellulitis.
  • Partial or complete loss of sense of smell: There is a risk of temporary or permanent loss of smell due to Nasal obstruction and inflammation of the nerve for smell (olfactory nerve).
  • Vision problems: If the infection spreads to your eyes, it can cause reduced vision or even cause permanent blindness.

Self-care for Acute Sinusitis

  • Follow healthy diet in order to keep your immune system strong.
  • Cover your head with a towel when you breathe in the steam from a bowl of hot water
  • Take decongestants
  • Place warm, wet towels around your nose, cheeks, and eyes to ease your facial pain
  • Drink plenty of fluids

Diagnosis of Acute Sinus Infection

Acute sinusitis Diagnosis usually involves a physical exam. Your doctor will gently press over your sinuses with their fingers and check for the presence of any infection.

The test may involve looking into your nose using light to identify inflammation, polyps, tumors, or other abnormalities. Your doctor may also perform the following tests to as a part of diagnosis:

Investigations for Acute Sinusitis

  • CT and MRI Scans of your sinus cavities
  • Nasal Endoscopy
  • Sinus Culture
  • X-ray sinuses

Nasal Endoscopy

Nasal endoscopy is the process of examining the nose using a nasal endoscope which is a thin and flexible fiber-optic scope. The test will help your doctor to identify inflammation or other abnormalities in your sinuses.

Imaging tests

Imaging tests like CT or MRI scan can be ordered by your doctor to look for inflammation or swelling and other sinus abnormalities in the nose. A CT scan consist of rotating X-rays and computers to take detailed cross-sectional images of your body. An MRI scan takes 3-D images of your body using radio waves and a magnetic field. Both of these are noninvasive tests.

Acute Sinusitis Treatment

In most cases, acute sinusitis can be treated at home with simple procedures:

  • A moist, warm washcloth: Wrap a warm cloth over your head to ease pain symptoms.
  • A humidifier: Humidifiers can help keep the air moist.
  • Saline nasal sprays: Use saline fluid several times a day to rinse and clear your nasal passages.
  • Stay hydrated: Drink plenty of fluids like water and juices in order to help thin mucus.
  • Over-the-counter (OTC) nasal spray: Some sprays that are available in medical shops can reduce intranasal and sinus inflammation.
  • OTC oral decongestant therapy: These therapies can dry up mucus.
  • OTC pain relievers: Taking over-the-counter decongestants or pain relievers prescribed by your doctor can help relieve sinus pain.
  • Sleep with your head elevated: This make your sinuses to drain.

Antibiotics Medication for Acute Sinus Infection

In most of the cases, Sinusitis Antibiotics aren’t needed to treat acute sinusitis. It may clear up without treatment even if your acute sinusitis is bacterial. Your doctor might wait and watch to see if your bacterial acute sinusitis worsens or getting cured.

However, you might require sinusitis antibiotics if you have severe or persistent or progressive symptoms. Be sure to take the whole course if your doctor prescribes any antibiotics even after your symptoms get better. Don’t stop taking them before time. If you do so, your sinus infection symptoms may come back.

Immunotherapy

If allergies are causing you sinusitis, immunotherapy, allergy shots can help reduce the body’s reaction to specific allergens may help treat your problem.

Acute Sinus Surgery

If the acute sinusitis has become more serious, then surgery may be the only option to treat the underlying cause of acute sinusitis and to get relief. Your doctor may perform surgery to remove nasal polyps or tumors, correct a deviated nasal septum and clean and drain your sinuses

The goal of sinus surgery is to clean the natural openings of the sinuses while leaving as many of the cilia as possible in place. Endoscopic surgery can be performed to restore normal sinus function by removing the areas of obstruction and restore the normal flow of mucus.

Endoscopic sinus surgery is generally performed with either local or general anesthesia. It takes about four weeks for full recovery after surgery. However, within about four days patients are typically able to return to their normal activities.

What you can do?

Make a list of:

  • Your symptoms, including any that seem unrelated to the reason for your appointment
  • Key personal information, including whether you have allergies or asthma and family medical history
  • All medications, vitamins or other supplements you take, including the doses
  • Take a family member or friend along, if possible, to help you remember the information you’re given.

Questions to ask your doctor:

The following are the questions to ask your doctor in case of Acute Sinusitis:

  1. What’s likely causing my symptoms?
  2. What are other possible causes for my symptoms?
  3. What tests do I need?
  4. Is my condition likely temporary or chronic?
  5. What’s the best course of action?
  6. What are the alternatives to the primary approach you’re suggesting?
  7. I have these other health conditions. How can I best manage them together?
  8. Are there restrictions I need to follow?
  9. Should I see a specialist?
  10. Are there brochures or other printed material I can have? What websites do you recommend?
  11. Don’t hesitate to ask other questions.

What to expect from your doctor?

Your doctor may ask you the following questions:

  1. When did your symptoms begin?
  2. Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional?
  3. How severe are your symptoms?
  4. What, if anything, seems to improve your symptoms?
  5. What, if anything, appears to worsen your symptoms?
  6. Do you smoke or are you around smoke or other pollutants?

 FAQs of Acute Sinusitis

When to see a doctor?

Most people suffering from acute sinusitis don’t need to see a doctor. Contact your doctor if you have any of the Symptoms that either don’t improve within a few days or worsen such as persistent fever, and a history of recurrent or chronic sinusitis.

Can I Prevent acute Sinusitis?

There is no particular way to prevent sinusitis. But there are some things that might help like avoid smoking, covering the head with a towel, using medicines prescribed by the doctor.

What happens if acute Sinusitis Isn’t Treated?

You will have a continuous pain and discomfort until it starts to clear up. In some rare cases, acute sinusitis can lead to meningitis, a brain abscess, or an infection of the bone if it is not treated. Talk to your doctor immediately about your symptoms.

Who gets acute Sinusitis?

Lots of people are getting affected by this. About 35 million Americans have acute sinusitis at least once each year.

How do you treat acute sinusitis?

Acute sinusitis can be treated at home by taking some self care measures. Antibiotics are needed when there is no improvement in your symptoms.

How many days will acute Sinusitis take to be cured while using antibiotics?

You’ll probably take them for 10 to 14 days if your doctor gives you antibiotics. The symptoms will slowly disappear with treatment.

Chronic Sinusitis – Sinus Infection Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Diagnosis

What is Chronic Sinus Infection/Sinusitis?

Chronic sinusitis also known as chronic rhinosinusitis is a common condition in which the cavities around nasal passages (sinuses) become inflamed and swollen around your eyes and face might feel swollen, and you might have facial pain or tenderness and lasts for at least 12 weeks, despite treatment attempts. This condition interferes with drainage and causes mucus buildup due to which breathing through your nose might be difficult.

Chronic Sinusitis can be brought on

  • by an infection
  • by growths in the sinuses (nasal polyps)
  • by a deviated nasal septum

The condition most commonly affects in young and middle-aged adults. However, it also can affect children.

What Causes Chronic Sinusitis?

Common causes of chronic sinusitis include:

  • Nasal polyps: These tissue growths can block the nasal passages or sinuses.
  • Deviated nasal septum: A crooked septum — the wall between the nostrils — may restrict or block sinus passages.
  • Other medical conditions: The complications of cystic fibrosis, gastroesophageal reflux, or HIV and other immune system-related diseases can result in nasal blockage.
  • Respiratory tract infections: Infections in your respiratory tract — most commonly colds — can inflame and thicken your sinus membranes and block mucus drainage. These infections can be viral, bacterial or fungal.
  • Allergies such as hay fever: Inflammation with allergies can block your sinuses.

Chronic Sinusitis symptoms

  1. Thick, discolored discharge from the nose
  2. Drainage down the back of the throat (postnasal drainage)
  3. Nasal obstruction or congestion which causes difficulty in breathing through your nose
  4. Pain, tenderness and swelling around your eyes, cheeks, nose or forehead
  5. Reduced sense of smell and taste in adults
  6. Cough in children
  7. Ear pain
  8. Aching in your upper jaw and teeth
  9. Cough that might worsen at night
  10. Sore throat
  11. Bad breath (halitosis)
  12. Fatigue or irritability
  13. Nausea

Risk factors involved in Chronic Sinusitis

The following are the risk factors concerned with Chronic Sinusitis:

  1. Nasal passage abnormality like deviated nasal septum or nasal polyps
  2. Asthma, which is highly connected to chronic sinusitis
  3. Aspirin sensitivity that causes respiratory symptoms
  4. An immune system disorder, such as HIV/AIDS or cystic fibrosis
  5. Hay fever or another allergic condition that affects your sinuses
  6. Regular exposure to pollutants such as cigarette smoke

Complications involved in Chronic Sinusitis

Chronic sinusitis complications include:

  • Meningitis: Inflammation of the membranes and fluid surrounding your brain and spinal cord.
  • Other infections: Uncommonly, the infection can spread to the bones (osteomyelitis) or skin (cellulitis).
  • Partial or complete loss of sense of smell: Nasal obstruction and inflammation of the nerve for smell (olfactory nerve) can cause temporary or permanent loss of smell.
  • Vision problems: If the infection spreads to your eye socket, it can cause reduced vision or even blindness that can be permanent.

When to see a doctor?

Consult a doctor immediately if you have below mentioned indications

  • High fever
  • Swelling or redness around your eyes
  • Severe headache
  • Confusion
  • Double vision or other vision changes
  • Stiff neck

Diagnosis of Chronic Sinusitis

Firstly your doctor will feel for tenderness in your nose, face and look inside your nose. The following are the methods adapted by your doctor for diagnosing chronic sinusitis:

  • Nasal endoscopy: This also is known as rhinoscopy and here the doctor inserts a thin, flexible tube (endoscope) with a fiber-optic light through your nose to see the inside of your sinuses.
  • Imaging studies: Images taken using a CT scan or MRI can show details of your sinuses and nasal area and might pinpoint a deep inflammation or physical obstruction that cannot be detected using an endoscope.
  • Nasal and sinus cultures: Cultures are generally considered unnecessary for diagnosing chronic sinusitis. This method is adapted when your sinuses fails to respond to treatment or is worsening. The tissue cultures help to determine the cause, such as bacteria or fungi.
  • An allergy test: This test is performed if your doctor suspects that the condition might be triggered by allergies. He or she might recommend an allergy skin test which is safe and quick and can help the doctor to pinpoint the allergen that’s responsible for your nasal flare-ups.

Treatment of Chronic Sinusitis

The goal of treating chronic sinusitis is to:

  • Reduce sinus inflammation
  • Keep your nasal passages draining
  • Eliminate the underlying cause
  • Reduce the number of sinusitis flare-ups

Treatments to relieve sinusitis symptoms

These treatments include:

  • Irrigation of Saline nasal, with nasal sprays or solutions, can reduce the drainage and rinses away irritants and allergies.
  • Nasal corticosteroids or nasal sprays help to prevent and treat inflammation.
  • Your doctor might recommend rinsing with a solution of saline mixed with drops or using a nasal mist of the solution if your symptoms couldn’t relieve.
  • Oral or injected corticosteroids are used to relieve inflammation from severe sinusitis, especially if you also have nasal polyps.
  • Aspirin desensitization treatment is gradually given larger doses of aspirin to increase your tolerance only under the prescription given by the Practitioner.

Popular Alternative treatments for Sinusitis infection

  1. Herbal treatment
  2. Facial Sinus massage
  3. Acupuncture treatment
  4. Medicines
  5. Homeopathy treatment
  6. Infrared light therapy
  7. Ayurvedic treatment

Say Goodbye to unbearable sinusitis pain naturally with these various treatments with home remedies for sinus and alternative treatment for sinusitis.

Prevention of Chronic Sinusitis

The following steps can help you to prevent Chronic Sinusitis:

  • Avoid upper respiratory infections
  • Minimize contact with people who have colds
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water, especially before meals.
  • Manage your allergies
  • Work with your doctor to keep symptoms under control.
  • Avoid cigarette smoke and polluted air as they can irritate and inflame your lungs and nasal passages.
  • Use a humidifier and be sure to keep the humidifier clean and free of the mold with regular, thorough cleaning.

Home remedies for Chronic Sinus Infection

Find here chronic sinusitis remedies. These natural remedies for sinus will help you to get relief from the sinus infection.

Home remedies for Sinus Infection

  • Take more rest so that your body can fight with inflammation and recover speedily.
  • Drink fluids, such as water or juice as they help to dilute mucous secretions and promote drainage.
  • Avoid beverages that contain caffeine or alcohol, which can be dehydrating.
  • Drinking alcohol also can worsen the swelling of the lining of the sinuses and nose.
  • Moisturize your sinus cavities.
  • Drape a towel over your head as you breathe in the vapor from a bowl of medium-hot water. Keep the vapor directed toward your face.
  • Take a hot shower, breathing in the warm, moist air to help ease pain and help mucus drain.
  • Apply warm compresses to your face by placing warm, damp towels around your nose, cheeks and eyes to ease facial pain.
  • Rinse out your nasal passages.
  • Use a specially designed squeeze bottle (Sinus Rinse, others), saline canister or neti pot to rinse your nasal passages.
  • Sleep with your head elevated as this will help your sinuses drain, reducing congestion.

What you can do?

Make a list of your symptoms that can be related to the reason for the doctor appointment

  • Key personal information, including whether you have allergies or asthma and family medical history
  • All medications, vitamins or other supplements you take, including the doses
  • Questions to ask your doctor
  • Take a family member or friend along, if possible, to help you remember the information you’re given.

Questions to ask your doctor include:

The following are the questions which you need to consider to ask your doctor:

  1. What’s likely causing my symptoms?
  2. What are other possible causes for my symptoms?
  3. What tests do I need?
  4. Is my condition likely temporary or chronic?
  5. What’s the best course of action?
  6. What are the alternatives to the primary approach you’re suggesting?
  7. I have these other health conditions. How can I best manage them together?
  8. Are there restrictions I need to follow?
  9. Should I see a specialist?
  10. Are there brochures or other printed material I can have? What websites do you recommend?

What to expect from your doctor?

Your doctor may ask you the following questions:

  1. When did your symptoms begin?
  2. Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional?
  3. How severe are your symptoms?
  4. What, if anything, seems to improve your symptoms?
  5. What, if anything, appears to worsen your symptoms?

FAQs of Chronic Sinusitis

How is chronic sinusitis treated?

Chronic sinusitis is not usually caused by a bacterial infection. Antibiotics often do not help in this case. Other ways to treat chronic sinusitis include:

  1. Avoiding triggers (usually related to allergies and environmental factors)
  2. Intranasal corticosteroid sprays
  3. Antifungal medication
  4. Treating the underlying condition (allergies or asthma)
  5. Topical antihistamine sprays or pills
  6. Leukotriene antagonists (pain killers)
  7. Surgery (typically to correct structural issues like a deviated nasal septum)

How do I prevent chronic sinusitis?

Treating the underlying conditions behind chronic sinusitis like asthma and allergies can help in preventing long-lasting sinusitis. Avoid allergens such as animal dander, dust, pollen which can trigger swelling in the sinuses.

Who Treats Chronic Sinusitis?

Otolaryngologist or as they are commonly known, an ENTs are specially trained to treat chronic sinusitis with medical and surgical interventions. However, you can seek treatment for chronic sinusitis from your primary care physician. In order to have the best treatment, you have to seek Otolaryngologist.

What are the treatments used by the Otolaryngologist?

Once the cause is determined appropriate treatment will begin and the following are the various treatments used by the Otolaryngologist:

  1. Decongestants
  2. Allergy medications
  3. Anti-fungal treatments
  4. Humidifiers
  5. Warm compresses
  6. Saline nose drops
  7. Nasal irrigation
  8. Sinus surgery

What are the similar symptoms of Acute and chronic sinusitis?

The following are the symptoms which Acute and Chronic Sinusitis have in common.

  • Facial pressure and pain
  • Thick discolored mucus
  • Congestion.

Hoping you got everything you ever wanted to know about Sinus Infection: Sinusitis causes, symptoms, treatment, prevention, natural remedies, mistakes to avoid, faqs.

· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·


Related Articles & Comments

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *